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Tower Seminar- 20th Anniversary: Ethnochoreology and Ethnomusicology at the Academy

February 28 at 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Presenters: Dr Theresa Buckland, Dr Catherine Foley, Professor John Morgan O’Connell, Dr Colin Quigley

Chairs: Dr Catherine Foley & Dr Colin Quigley

The Ethnochoreology and Ethnomusicology postgraduate degree programmes were established in 1996, within the then Irish World Music Centre, University of Limerick. These were distinctive programmes at universities in Ireland at that time, with the MA Ethnochoreology being the first programme of its type at any university in Europe. Since then both fields of study have undergone new developments in theory, method, and research themes as well as rapid international growth.

This panel of course directors and examiners will look back on the 20 years passed since graduating their first MA students to consider the contributions of these programmes to the study of music and dance in Ireland and internationally. This Anniversary seminar is presented in association with the ETHNO Research Cluster.

Dr Theresa Buckland is Professor of Dance History and Ethnography at the University of Roehampton, London. Her chief publications are: Dance in the Field: Theory, Methods and Issues in Dance Ethnography (ed.1999), Dancing from Past to Present: Nation, Culture, Identities (ed. 2006), and Society Dancing: Fashionable Bodies In England 1870-1920 (2011). Recent writings focus on early English ballroom dancing, the emergence of dance as a discipline and a book project on popular dancing in Victorian England.

Dr Catherine Foley is Senior Lecturer in Ethnochoreology and Founding Course Director of both the MA Ethnochoreology and the MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance programmes at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. She is Founding Chair Emerita of the international society, Dance Research Forum Ireland, and is Founding Director of the National Dance Archive of Ireland. She is the elected Chair of the International Council for Traditional Music’s (ICTM) Study Group on Ethnochoreology and is an elected member of the ICTM’s Executive Board. Her monographs include Irish Traditional Step Dancing in North Kerry (North Kerry Literary Trust 2012; book and DVD) and Step Dancing in Ireland: Culture and History (Ashgate 2013; Routledge 2015), which was shortlisted for the Katharine Briggs Folklore Award 2014. Her research has also been published in Yearbook for Traditional Music, Dance Research Journal, Dance Research and New Hibernia Review.

Professor John Morgan O’Connell is an Irish ethnomusicologist with a specialist interest in cultural history. His recent monograph entitled ‘Commemorating Gallipoli’ (Rowman and Littlefield, 2017) examines the role of music in the memorialisation of a military campaign from the perspective of the Turks and the Germans, the Australians and the British. Significantly, the book foregrounds the importance of music and militarism for Irish soldiers involved in the military disaster. Apart from many publications on music in the Middle East, John Morgan O’Connell has also published a monograph on style in Turkish music (Routledge, [2013] 2015) and edited a volume on music and conflict (Illinois, 2010).

Dr Colin Quigley is Course Director of the MA Ethnomusicology at the Irish World Academy. His research is located at the intersection of this field with Folkloristics and Ethnochoreology. His publications include “The Hungarian Dance House Movement and Revival of Transylvanian String Band Music,” in The [Oxford] Handbook of Music Revivals (2014); “Confronting Legacies of Ethnic-National Discourse in Scholarship and Practice: Traditional Music and Dance in Central Transylvania” in Journal of Folklore Research (2016); Close to the Floor: Irish Dance from the Boreen to Broadway (2008), Music from the Heart: Compositions of a Folk Fiddler (1995), and Close to the Floor: Folk Dance in Rural Newfoundland (1985).

Details

Date:
February 28
Time:
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Venue

Irish World Academy
Irish World Academy
Limerick, Ireland
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