Participatory and Arts-Based Methods Involving Migrants in Health Research (PART-IM)
Introduction

This group brings together arts-based and participatory scholars from medicine, nursing & midwifery, and the performing arts, as well as a leading NGO for migrants. Our vision is to develop increased understanding of the role of arts-based methods as participatory strategies for involving migrants in health research.

Migration is a global phenomenon and in 2016 WHO Europe published the first ever WHO strategy and action plan for refugee and migrant health. 17% of the population of Ireland is now born outside the country. In line with international imperatives for Public and Patient Involvement (PPI), involving migrants in health research is important. However, there is a persistent pattern of migrants’ exclusion from health-related participatory spaces.

University of Limerick scholars are field leaders in participatory approaches to health research. There is also a pioneering cohort of scholars focused on arts-based research and health, particularly in relation to singing. Both groups have developed capacity in participatory and arts-based research with specific reference to issues of migration.

Combined, we represent a unique and innovative collaboration to support existing and new collaborations and to shape national and international migrant health research and policy. Drawing on our experience of using participatory and arts-based methods, and utilising the existing infrastructure of the PPI theme in the Health Research Institute (HRI) at the University of Limerick (UL) we will work with existing civic engagement energies including the UL Sanctuary group and UL Engage towards three key goals:

Research: to expand the evidence base for the role of arts-based methods in migrant health research and to evaluate training in the use of participatory and arts-based methods.

Collaboration and networking:  to develop stronger links between arts, heath and migrant research energies within the university and beyond, and model networking strategies such as the Irish World Music Café.

Capacity Building and Training: to develop training opportunities in arts-based research methods for health workers, migrants and researchers, with a view to building skill, knowledge, resources, and confidence in the application of this approach.

Our People

Principal Investigator: Prof Helen Phelan (Irish World Academy of Music and Dance)

Research Team

 

Co-Applicant: Prof Anne MacFarlane (Graduate Medical School)

Co-Applicant: Dr. Sylvia Murphy Tighe (Department of Nursing & Midwifery)

Official Collaborator: Dr. Tríona McCaffrey (Irish World Academy of Music and Dance)

Official Collaborator: Dr. Hilary Moss (Irish World Academy of Music and Dance)

Official Collaborator: Dr. Susann Huschke (Graduate Medical School)

Official Collaborator: Prof. Ailish Hannigan (School of Medicine)

Postdoctoral Researcher: Dr Fran Garry

Official Collaborator: Ahmed Hassan, Doras Luimní https://doras.org

Publications

Connolly, L. & Moss, H. (2019) ‘Music, spirituality and dementia: Exploring joint working between pastoral care professionals and music therapists to improve person-centred care for people with dementia (Innovative Practice)’, Dementia (London, England), Available: https://doi-org.proxy.lib.ul.ie/10.1177%2F1471301219885560.

Dingle, G. A., Clift, S., Finn, S., Gilbert, R., Groarke, J.M., Irons, Y., Bartoli, A. J., Lamont, A., Launay, J., Martin, E.S., Moss, H., Sanfilippo, K. R., Shipton, M., Stewart, L., Talbot, S.,Tarrant, M., Tip, L., & Williams, E. J. (2019) ‘An Agenda for Best Practice Research on Group Singing, Health, and Well-Being’, Music & Science, 2, Available: https://doi.org/10.1177%2F2059204319861719

Fitzpatrick, K., Moss, H. and Harmon, D. (2019) ‘Music in the chronic pain experience: An Investigation into the Use of Music and Music therapy by Patients and Staff at a Hospital Outpatient Pain Clinic’, Music and Medicine, 11, 6- 22.

Hannigan, A., Villarroel, N., Roura, M., LeMaster,J., Basogomba, A., Bradley, C., MacFarlane, A. (2020) Ethnicity recording in health and social care data collections in Ireland: where and how is it measured and what is it used for? International Journal for Equity in Health https://equityhealthj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12939-019-1107-y

McCaffrey, T., Cheung, P. S., Barry, M., Punch, P., & Dore, L. (2020). The role and outcomes of music listening for women in childbirth: An integrative review. Midwifery, 83. doi: 10.1016/j.midw.2020.102627

McNamara, P., Wang, R., Moss, H. (2019) ‘Exploring a potential role for music therapy to promote positive communication and emotional change for couples: A single-session pilot case study’. Approaches – an Interdisciplinary Journal of Music Therapy, Available: http://approaches.gr/mcnamara-a20190730.

Moss, H. & O’ Donoghue, J. (2019) ‘An evaluation of workplace choir singing amongst Health Service staff in Ireland’, Health promotion international, Available: https://doi-org.proxy.lib.ul.ie/10.1093/heapro/daz044.

Nelligan, S., Hayes, T., & McCaffrey, T. (2020). A personal recovery narrative through Rap music in music therapy. In A. Hargreaves & A. Maguire (Eds.), Schizophrenia: Triggers and Treatments, (pp. 233-268). New York: Nova Science.

Nelligan, S., & McCaffrey, T. (2020). An investigation of music therapists’ experiences of verbal dialogue in music therapy sessions. Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy, 20(1). Retrieved from: https://voices.no/index.php/voices/article/view/2868/2926

O’Donoghue, J., Moss, H., Clements-Cortés, Freeley, C. (2020) `Therapist and individual experiences and perceptions of music therapy for adolescents who stutter: A qualitative exploration’. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy

O’Neill, D., Kelly, B., O’Keeffe, S, Moss, H (2020) ‘Mainstreaming medical humanities in continuous professional development and postgraduate training. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 20 (2),208 – 11.

Tierney, E., Hannigan, A., Kinneen, L., May,C.,  O’ Sullivan, M., King, R., Kennedy, N., and MacFarlane, A. (2019) Interdisciplinary team working in the Irish primary healthcare system: Analysis of ‘invisible’ bottom up innovations using Normalisation Process Theory. Health Policy https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2019.09.002

van den Muijsenbergh METC, LeMaster JW, Shahiri P, Brouwer M, Hussain M, Dowrick C, Papadakaki M, Lionis C and MacFarlane A. (2020) Participatory implementation research in the field of migrant health: Sustainable changes and ripple effects over time. Health Expectations https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.13034

News
Arts-Based Methods in Health Research

June 25-26, 2020

Helen Phelan and Fran Garry delivered a workshop on “Arts-Based Methods in Health Research” as part of the Public and Patient Involvement Summer School. Several workshop participants expressed interest in ongoing involvement with PART-IM training opportunities. https://sulis.ul.ie/portal/site/4fffd32f-5aac-48a1-859e-ad1284f2e0da

 

Irish World Music Cafe

June 26th, 2020

To mark World Refugee Day (June 20th) the  launched a week of on-line video contributions from around the world, culminating in a live cafe event on June 26th, 2020. The cafe was started by Helen Phelan in 2016 as a social and cultural space for newcomers to meet other people living in Ireland. The participatory ethos of the cafe is being utilised by PART-IM as a model for the development of arts-based partnerships.

 

The Promise and Power of Arts Based Research  

21 October 2020

Over 185 people from around the world participated in a webinar by best-selling author and internationally renowned arts-based scholar, Professor Patricia Leavy, co-hosted by the Health Research Institute PART-IM (Participatory and Arts-Based Methods Involving Migrants in Health Research) cluster and HRB PPI Ignite. Professor Leavy is Former Chair of Sociology and Criminology, and Founding Director of Gender Studies at Stonehill College in Massachusetts. She has published over 30 books and is series creator and editor for ten book series with Oxford University Press, Guilford Press, and Brill/Sense  The webinar marked the first in a series of public events on singing with culturally diverse communities, which was launched by University of Limerick President, Professor Kerstin Mey.

 

Singing with the Voices of the World: A Day of Online Workshops on Singing, Health and Working with Global Voices

14 November 2020 

Singing with the Voices of the World was a one day immersion event featuring musicians, conductors, community and health workers who are passionate about the role of the voice in health and well-being, with a particular focus on cultural inclusivity and diversity. The workshops featured expert facilitators from Musicians Without Borders, Sing Up! UK, the American Institute of Music and Healing, as well as the well-known Irish conductor and passionate advocate for community singing, David Brophy.

 

Singing as a Tool for Community Building in Changing Societies

5 February 2021- 2 April 2021

Musicians Without Borders (MWB) have kicked off a new training partnership with PART-IM through a five part training programme on ‘Singing as a tool for community building in changing societies’. Topics include ‘Music and the Nervous System’; ‘The Leader’s Role in Community Building Through Singing’; ‘Structuring Community Singing Sessions’ and ‘Getting Started in Your Community’. MWB are globally recognised for their work in using music as a tool of peace-building and social change and this is the first in a series of partnered programmes they will offer with PART-IM at UL.

Social Media

YouTube : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwjkoOLfAxZrtaR8vMnO4BQ

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PART_IM_

Inquiries regarding membership should be sent to helen.phelan@ul.ie

Migration and Integration Research Directory

Research Projects on Migration and Integration in Limerick

 

Access and Inclusion of International and Non-traditional Students in Third Level Education: A Cross-cultural Comparison Between the Brazilian and Irish Context

 

What strategies higher education institutions develop to promote social inclusion among non-traditional and international students and to create an intercultural environment? This research aims to compare two universities, one in Brazil (Federal University of Latin American Integration) and one in Ireland (University of Limerick), with a cross-cultural mix method design, to investigate the social and academic integration of students with a disadvantaged background and a different ethnocultural identity than the mainstream majority students. 

Project Leader:

Leticia Scheidt – Department of Psychology, UL

Project Members: 

Dr Anca Minescu – Department of Psychology & Dr Máiréad Moriarty – School of Modern Languages and Applied Linguistics, UL

Email:

leticia.scheidt@ul.ie

 

 

A Dynamic Intersectional Model of Immigrant Experiences

 

Debates about immigrants and immigration are vitriolic and contentious; accordingly, researchers focus on receiving country’s propensity for antipathy. For a fuller picture of how immigrants are received, it is important to account for positive responses to immigrants and their concerns. Our goal is to shift from the assumption that receiving countries’ default response to immigrants is antipathy. Using our Dynamic Intersectional Model of Immigrant Experiences as a guide, we have initiated a programme of research that begins from the assumption that responses to immigrants and immigration are complex and variable. We explore identity related psychological processes and sociocultural factors that facilitate prosocial emotions and attitudes toward immigrants and immigration policy.

Project Leader:

Dr Ronni M. Greenwood – Department of Psychology, UL

Email:

ronni.greenwood@ul.ie

 

 

Aren’t We All Human? Media Charity Campaigns Predicting Collective Action and Positive Stereotypes of Syrian Refugees in Ireland

 

Focusing on the underlying consequences of the paternalistic portrayals of victims and humanitarian aid in charity media campaigns, an experimental design tested how two antagonist campaigns predict collective action and stereotypes about Syrian refugees in Ireland. The results showed that campaigning predicts worse stereotypes than not campaigning at all, human identity strongly predicts collective action as threat for people’s stereotypes about refugees, and empathy as a weak predictor of both attitudes. This study has shed some light into the negative backlash of charity media campaigns and the necessity to both achieve the public’s engagement and positive stereotypes about humanitarian causes without undermining one goal by the success of the other. The team includes Dr.Anca Minescu.

Project Leader:

Beatriz Gómez Moreno – Department of Psychology, UL

Email:

beatriz.gomezmoreno@ul.ie

 

 

Arpad Volgyesi

 

CMDCS is a research project in partnership between the University of Limerick and West Limerick Resources, aiming to investigate issues around disadvantage and community participation in Abbeyfeale, co. Limerick. Our qualitative study, based on interviews with local residents and official stakeholders, involved a community needs assessment with the goal of mapping collective identity and efficacy as significant factors behind successful collective action.
We conducted 28 semi-structured interviews and used thematic analysis to explore themes around collective efficacy and identity, obstacles and promises in community participation, with an additional focus on prejudice, discrimination and divide in the context of Irish Settled and Traveller people.

Project Leaders:

Anca Minescu & Arpad VolgyesiDepartment of Psychology, UL

Email:

volgyesi.arpad@ppk.elte.hu

 

 

Asian Nurses Experiences of MSC Education in Ireland

 

Despite the calls to increase the number of interna- tional students in higher education, little is known of the learning experiences of international students on MSc nursing programmes. A qualitative study design was used to explore the day to day realities of how Asian nurses experience learning, whilst juggling life and study in a new country. This study shares the realities for individual and collective international student journeys’ while undertaking MSc education in another country. It highlights the importance of having flexible, responsive, student centred individual and collective group learning, teaching, approaches and supports. The project team includes Brid O Brien, Margaret Graham, Claire O Donnell, Jan McCarthy, Deirdre O Sullivan, Dympna Tuohy, Therese Hennessy and Anne Fahy, of the Department of Nursing & Mid- wifery.

Project Leader:

Dr. Kathleen Markey – Department of Nursing & Midwifery, UL

Email:

Kathleen.markey@ul.ie

 

 

Brexit and the loss of EU membership: A Potential Threat to Intergroup Relations in Northern Ireland

 

Brexit may lead to people living in Northern Ireland no longer seeing themselves as EU-citizens. Previous research indicates that the feeling of belonging to this inclusive group of EU citizens has played a role in maintaining peace between different groups that were central to the conflict in Northern Ireland. Therefore, Brexit potentially poses a threat to the achieved peace in the region, resulting from the loss of identity with EU citizens. It is important then that we understand what happens when people lose the overarching, inclusive group that the EU represents. The present project will investigate how the loss of this group membership effects people’s identities and the implications for relationships between the region’s subgroups.

Project Leader:

Jack Loughnane – Department of Psychology, UL

Email:

jack.loughnane@ul.ie

 

 

Collaborating on Perinatal Mental Health Support for Migrant Women and their Families: Networking and Connecting the Dots

 

Growing evidence highlighting that migrant women are particularly vulnerable to perinatal mental health (PMH) problems is concerning and is further complicated by COVID-19. Migrant women and their families experience a range of challenges preventing them from seeking help and accessing perinatal mental health supports. Although, there are pockets of excellence offering various supports for migrant communities and perinatal mental healthcare in Ireland, these services often work in silos with limited opportunities for multi-agency working and networking. This project aims to nurture networking and intersectional collaborative opportunities where key stakeholders come together to collectively examine PMH supports for migrant women, recognising successes and areas for collaborative action.

Project Leader:

Dr. Kathleen Markey – Department of Nursing and Midwifery

Email:

kathleen.markey@ul.ie

 

Demographic Trends & Normative Influences on Prejudice Against Travellers in Ireland

 

Limited research exists on the nature of prejudice towards the Irish Traveller Community. With a nationally representative sample collected as part of the PolRom project (N=1000), we aim to build upon our social-psychological understanding of anti-Gypsyism in the Irish context. Part 1 examines demographic variations in Traveller-specific prejudice. A tendency for higher prejudice in certain demographics is revealed, however, prejudice is evident across the sample. Part 2 examines the extent to which descriptive and injunctive norms might independently influence anti-Gypsyism. Clear support for a normative influence is revealed. We emphasise the need for further research into the underpinnings of this ‘last acceptable form of racism’ to benefit prejudice-reduction interventions.

Project Leader: 

Robert Brennan & Dr Anca Minescu – Psychology – Migration and Integration Lab

Email: 

rnb1995@live.ie

 

 

Digital Well-being and Teenage Social Media Engagement: An Ingroup-led Intervention Approach

 

The negative associations between adolescent use of social networking sites (SNS) and adolescent well-being has led to a growing number of campaigns with not apparent success. This project entails a Digital Awareness Intervention to adolescents with a module for Transition Year students promoting students’ well-being by increasing their research skills and awareness of the effects of SNS. The innovative aspect is its social identity approach which highlights the relevance social inclusion and well-being in schools with a diverse study body by using an ingroup-led intervention with TY-students, considered as reliable sources of information. Higher levels of awareness and greater behavioural change impact are expected. 

Project Leader:

Daragh Bradshaw– Department of Psychology, UL

Project Members: 

Dr Anca Minescu & Beatriz Gómez – Department of Psychology, UL

Email:

daragh.bradshaw@ul.ie

 

 

Experiences and Outcomes of Community Solidarity Initiatives with Displaced People and Host Communities in Ireland: A Multi-method Project

 

In Ireland, displaced people live within the Direct Provision (DP) system. In this system, displaced people experience disempowering regulations affecting their right to work and live dignified, independent lives. DP segregates displaced people from the wider Irish society, which exacerbates prejudice and discrimination towards them. In response, community solidarity initiatives (CSI) have developed across Ireland, to create opportunities for meaningful connection through shared activities. Across three studies, our research aims to investigate 1) how displaced people and the host community experience intergroup contact in CSI, and 2) whether and how CSI achieve their aims for both displaced people and host community members.

Project Leader: 

Megan Vine & Dr. Ronni Michelle Greenwood- Department of Psychology, UL 

Email: 

megan.vine@ul.ie

 

 

Exploring a New Paradigm for Intercultural Competence and Teacher Preparedness in Second Level Classrooms

 

This mixed methods research project will explore secondary teachers’ preparedness to teach in diverse and intercultural classrooms. The study will gather data via a survey of transition year students, their parents and teachers on attitudes around topics taught in the Social, Personal and Health Education (S.P.H.E.) and Civic, Social and Political Education (C.S.P.E.) curriculum. The findings will be disseminated and used in a Continuous Professional Development workshop with teachers, exploring their perspectives on diversity and culture. This approach is framed within a collaborative and participative action research model whereby both teachers and researcher are able to discuss, reflect and apply critical thinking to the themes and issues gleaned from the report of findings. The aim is to look at approaches that support and empower them in their role as teachers in emerging intercultural classrooms.

Project Leader:

Santhi Corcoran – Department of Learning Society and Religious Education, MIC

Project Members:

Dr Angela Canny – MIC & Dr Anca Minescu – UL

Email:

santhi.corcoran@mic.ul.ie

 

 

German Migration to Ireland Since 1922


This project looks at the different individuals and groups who came at different periods from Germany to live in Ireland, showcasing how migration impacted on an independent Ireland from the foundation of the State. Musicians, artists, entrepreneurs, scholars, engineers, butchers, linguists, lovers as well as refugees and people looking for a utopian space came to Ireland and stayed. Utilising methodologies from migration research and combining overviews, contextualisation and case studies, the project aims to explore the multifacetedness of migration, its effects on a microlevel, for example on identity formation, language, family roles and intergenerational experiences as well as its influence on science, the economy and societal perceptions.

Project Leader:

Prof Gisela Holfter – Centre for Irish-German Studies, MLAL

Email:

Gisela.Holfter@ul.ie

 

 

HSE CHO2 Equality Action Plan for Trained Interpreters in General Practice Services


The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (IHREC) has invited the HSE CH02 to write an Equality Action Plan (EAP) with the aim of ensuring that professional linguistic interpreter services are available to all free general practitioner services for patients in need. There is a legal obligation for the HSE to address and resolve this issue based on the Public Sector Equality and Human Rights Duty.
At the moment, migrant patients/non-Native speakers may not always be able to avail of a trained, professional interpreter during consultations with their GPs. This can have serious effects on the communication between a patient and their GP/nurse leading to negative health outcomes. This HSE UL collaboration will result in an EAP for implementation in general practice.

 

Project Leader:

Anne MacFarlane – School of Medicine, UL

Email:

anne.macfarlane@ul.ie

 

 

Identity and Political Processes on Quality of Intergroup Relationship with Different Outgroups in the Context of South Korea


Like Ireland, South Korea has gone through the experience of colonial rule and national division. The experience of the colonial rule under Japan during World War II and the national division during the Cold War has led South Korea to reformulate its collective identity and to develop intricate relationships with their neighboring states. The identity entrenched in historical grudges often become the sources of intergroup conflicts. Thus, this project explores the South Koreans’ quality of relationships with Japanese and North Korean defectors, and political and identity processes involved in the relationships. This project expands the psychological understanding of East Asian intergroup relations, providing insights into peacebuilding in the region.

Project Leader:

Evelyn Hye Kyung Jeong – Department of Psychology, UL

Project Members:

Dr. Anca Minescu – Department of Psychology, UL

Email:

Evelyn.Jeong@ul.ie

 

 

Moved by Social Justice: Exploring the Emotional Mechanism in Collective Action toward the Disadvantaged


Recent approaches to collective action have pointed out the relevance to identify the emotional mechanisms that can, on the one hand, promote social cohesion and, on the other hand, foster social change in the larger society.This research aims to understand the emotional mechanisms that can contribute to collective action to benefit disadvantaged group members in society. We focus on the role of positive emotions, particularly in an emotion known as Kama muta (Sanskrit,”moved by love”). This emotion has the potential to encourage positive intergroup relations and foster solidarity and commitment with a social cause. Currently, we framed this research in the Black Lives Matter movement and the reduction of racial inequalities.

Project Leader:

Diana Lizarazo – Department of Psychology, UL

Project Members:

Dr.Thomas Schubert & Dr.Jenny Roth – Department of Psychology, UL

Email:

Diana.lizarazo@ul.ie

 

 

PART-IM (Participatory and Arts-Based Methods Involving Migrants in Health Research)


Funded by the Health Research Institute, PART-IM brings together arts-based and participatory scholars from medicine, nursing & midwifery, and the performing arts, as well as a leading NGO for migrants. Our vision is to develop increased understanding of the role of arts-based methods as participatory strategies for involving migrants in health research. Our research expands the evidence base for the benefits of arts-based research (ABR), with a particular focus on music.Through a training partnership with Musicians Without Borders, we also strive to increase capacity and expertise in the use of ABR in the area of migrant health.

 

Project Leader:

Professor Helen Phelan – Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, UL

Project Members:

Prof Anne MacFarlane & Dr. Sylvia Murphy (cluster co-coordinators)

Dr. Fran Garry (post-doctoral researcher) and cluster members

Email:

helen.phelan@ul.ie

 

 

 

 

Navigating Learning and Teaching in Intercultural Nursing Classrooms


This study reports on the experiences of faculty, international and home students of learning and teaching in intercultural nursing classrooms. It highlights the multifaceted responses to cultural diversity in the learning environment, adding new dimensions to the existing discourse on intercultural learning and cultural competence development. The complexities associated with meeting individual and collective learning needs of students who come from diverse cultural, educational and clinical experience backgrounds, are highlighted. Creating positive intercultural inclusiveness, culturally responsive teaching and nurturing capacity to see differing perspectives, oneself and others in more inclusive ways is essential in supporting quality student learning and preparation for practice.

Project Leader:

Dr. Kathleen Markey – Department of Nursing and Midwifery

Project Members:

Brid O Brien, Margaret Graham, Claire O Donnell, Dympna Tuohy; Jan McCarthy, Therese Hennessy and Anne Fahy – Department of Nursing & Midwifery

Email:

kathleen.markey@ul.ie

 

 

Night Spaces: Migration, Culture and Integration in Europe (NITE)


The NITE project is funded through The Humanities in the European Research Area (HERA) and involves a transdisciplinary collaboration across eight European cities to understand how night spaces are dynamically produced, imagined, experienced and narrated by migrant communities in Europe. The Irish Team, Dr Ailbhe Kenny and Dr Katie Young, explore African migrant music-making in Galway and Cork. The project specifically explores musical activity and experiences within night spaces to interrogate issues of access, belonging and identity. Through multiple artists, sites, genres and types of data, the potential of musical participation in urban night scenes as spaces for interculturality are highlighted.

Project Leader:

Dr Ailbhe Kenny – Arts Education and Physical Education, MIC

Email:

ailbhe.kenny@mic.ul.ie

 

 

Reducing Minority Group Prejudice in Ireland


Ireland has largely been portrayed as an open, cosmopolitan, tourist-friendly society. However, instances of racism are still prevalent in Irish society. The aim of this research was to investigate ways of reducing prejudicial responses towards minority group members in Ireland. We examined a number of individual predispositions associated with more positive responses towards minority group members, including social identity, levels of empathy and contact with minority group members. In addition, we aimed to understand when situational cues can successfully reduce minority group prejudice. Finally, we investigated the sociological and historical factors which lead to different attitudes towards the different minority groups in Ireland.

Project Leader:

Jack Loughnane – Department of Psychology, UL

Email:

jack.loughnane@ul.ie

 

 

Resigned Indifference: An Explanation of the Gaps in Care for Culturally Diverse Patients


This grounded theory study explored student and registered nurses behaviours when caring for patients from diverse cultural, linguistic and ethnic backgrounds. Nurses want to provide quality care, but substandard care to culturally diverse patients is evident. A theory of resigned Indifference was generated, which explains how nurses used a raft of disengagement strategies as a means of dealing with their uncertainties, during cross cultural encounters. Disengagement went unchallenged and as a result nurses became indifferent to people they knew little about and appeared resigned that this was acceptable. The need for greater consideration into how cultural competence development is taught, learnt and applied in clinical practice, is illuminated.

Project Leader:

Dr. Kathleen Markey – Department of Nursing and Midwifery

Email:

kathleen.markey@ul.ie

 

 

Singing & Social Inclusion


Arising from the Irish Research Council funded ‘Singing and Sustainable Social Inclusion’ project, the Singing & Social Inclusion cluster brings together researchers in community music ethnomusicology, Irish traditional song, music education, music therapy, ritual studies and arts practice and arts-based research to support interdisciplinary research around issues of singing & inclusivity. Singing, Migration and Cultural Diversity is a key strand of the cluster’s work and includes projects such as the ‘Irish World Music Cafe’ and the ‘World Carnival’ project with Presentation Primary School, the Irish Chamber Orchestra and Music Generation.

 

Project Leader:

Professor Helen Phelan – Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, UL

Project Members:

Hilary Moss – Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, UL

Email:

helen.phelan@ul.ie

 

 

The Imaginary Friends of my Friends: The Role of Social Norms to Enhance Imagined Contact Effects on Children’s Prejudice Towards Refugees

 

As the effects of the refugee crisis continue to diversify society, the school setting provides a fertile ground to foster attitudes of tolerance among the emerging generations. Across three studies, we develop a field intervention incorporating normative influence with imagined intergroup contact to reduce children’s anti-refugee bias in schools. Findings illustrate the importance of family, class-peer, and religious ingroup norms. Imagined contact activities framed with supportive norms facilitated prejudice reduction among primary school children (age 9-13). Class-peer norm-framed imagined contact was particularly effective. These studies shed light on the efficacy of teacher-led imagined contact interventions, and the importance of a supportive normative context for anti-refugee bias.

Project Leader:

Elaine Smith – Department of Psychology

Email:

elaine.Smith@ul.ie

 

 

Understanding Intercultural Competence of International Students in Light of Their Lived Experiences in Ireland


This research offers an insight into the intercultural experiences of international students in Ireland in order to understand how they experience intercultural encounters and develop intercultural competence through their lived experiences. This study took an inductive thematic analytical approach, using semi-structured interviews with thirteen international students enrolled in a public university within the Western region of the Republic of Ireland. The findings revealed that international students’ value intercultural differences as a method of intercultural learning, and engaged in self-reflection and evaluations in order to improve intercultural interactions.

Project Leader:

Vanessa Laber – Department of Psychology

Email:

vlaber@hotmail.co.uk

 

 

WHO Collaborating Centre for Migrants’ Involvement in Health Research


The PPI Research Unit is a designated World Health Organization Collaborating Centre. Our centre’s main goal is to build capacity for participatory health research to involve migrants in health decision-making.The center has two main goals in the next four years (2019-2023):

1) To develop guidance on the use of participatory health research by identifying international principles and best practices for the meaningful involvement of migrants in a health research partnership

2) To support WHO to devise and pilot a participatory health research training course and manual to build capacity for the meaningful involvements of migrants and other key stakeholders in health research partnerships.

Project Leader:

Anne MacFarlane – School of Medicine, UL

Email:

anne.macfarlane@ul.ie